The Books I Read in June 2018

June was always going to be a busy month for me, so I went into it with the goal of reading a minimum of five books – fewer than I normally read in a month but still enough to keep me on track with my Goodreads Challenge of 100 books a year. This goal, I somehow managed to achieve within the first two weeks. The rest of the month, however, was less successful – I only finished one other book, although had two others started as well.

As June was Pride month, I prioritised reading books with LGBTQA+ characters or themes which, given I am trying to limit buying books and the genres I read (fantasy, crime etc.) don’t often specify having LGBTQA+ characters, choosing the books proved a little difficult. Plenty of research and serendipitous discoveries later, and I ended up finishing the month with a good mix of stories, all of which met the theme of the month.

My favourite read of July was, with little argument, Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo – I loved the first book and the second one surpassed all my expectations. My main disappointment was that it was the final book in the duology and so the last I would see of the characters together (although there may be promise of another book further down the line). The most disappointing book for me was, unfortunately, On the Other Side by Carrie Hope Fletcher to the point where I nearly did not finish it. I’ve never really enjoyed books with a heavy romance element and this book appeared to sacrifice the main character’s personal journey, her hopes and fears, to focus on a relationship that only lasted a year. While many others did enjoy it, it was just not a book for me. The ratings of these books and the other books I read are below:

For reference, the way I rate is as follows:

1-Unable to Finish ; 2-Did not enjoy ; 3-Liked ; 4-Really Liked ; 5-Loved

Audiobook

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee, narrated by Christian Coulson – 4/5

 

Hardback

A Secret Sisterhood by Emily Midorikawa & Emma Claire Sweeney – 3/5

Falling in Love by Donna Leon – 4/5

Paperback

Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo – 5/5

On the Other Side by Carrie Hope Fletcher – 2.5/5

The Girls by Emma Cline – 4/5

 

July is going to be quite a busy month for me, both on the reading and writing side. I have two readathons I want to take part taking place during July, and another one which starts at the end of July. The readathons are Tome Topple (where you try with a focus on books with 500+ pages), the Biannual Bibliothon (7 days, 7 challenges) and Book-Tube-Athon which crosses over into August. These readathons should hopefully mean that I am able to get ahead with my Goodreads challenge while readings a good variety of books.

That being said, July is also the month of Camp NaNoWriMo, which I am endeavouring to take part in and finish writing/re-writing my current WIP as well as continue on the submission work for my completed manuscript. I am hoping one of these two pursuits does not end up taking over the other, but regardless it should be quite a fun month.

 

 

 

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Currently Reading and Currently Writing

I don’t know where the weeks are going – so much is going on and I have barely enough time to sit down and read for a decent stretch of time. As a result, I’ve not been able to finish a book for a week or so. I have a couple of books on the go, and a whole number I want to get to this summer.

The first of the books I am currently reading is Thunderhead, the sequel to Scythe by Neal Shusterman, which I am listening to as an audiobook. I loved the first book – it had me hooked and I devoured it within a week (partially helped by the readathon I was listening to it for). Thunderhead continues the story. I find I enjoy audiobooks more when I listen to them for longer periods of time, which is why it is taking me so long to finish Thunderhead. I simply don’t want to listen to it in five-minute sessions as I think my enjoyment of the story suffers by me doing so and yet I am struggling to find enough time to have it on. I am really enjoying the story, however, and am going to try and find more time to sit back and listen, even if it means having it on while I’m pottering around the house doing the regular chores.

I am also currently reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon. This is an omnibus of the trilogy and, as a result, is over 1,000 pages long. I am currently around half-way through the first book. The writing in small and the pages thin. As such, it is going to take me a long time to finish this book (I’m still deciding whether to count it as one book or three). I also face a similar problem with this book as I have with Thunderhead – there is simply not enough time for me to sit down and give this book the attention it deserves. I do, however, have a couple of rather long train journeys coming up which could be the perfect opportunity to get fully engrossed in Paks’ story. I am also going to try and reinstate my rule of switching off screens and reading for half-an-hour or so before bed. It is a great way to relax after the end of the day and really helps with reading all the books one wants to.

As well as those two books, I have also been reading my own manuscript. This is to give it a final proofread and to reacquaint myself with the story before I start sending it off for submissions. It is a really strange experience reading your own book as if it was any other story, but I am quite enjoying being back with my characters and seeing a living and breathing story within the pages. I have about half an hour left to read of it, according to my kindle, and I am just approaching the climactic scenes. Fingers crossed they’re as good as I hoped they would be when I wrote and edited them!

Other writing projects have partially stagnated recently due to work being generally quite hectic. I am slowly resurrecting the various stories I had planned and getting myself back into the worlds and characters which make them. One of these projects is a book I wrote about two-thirds of in NaNoWriMo last year while the others are more half-formed creations waiting to be realised. With Camp NaNoWriMo coming up, I am hoping to get myself back into the writing spirit and see some of these ideas come to life, and maybe even finish one of them off.

That’s all for this quick update on reading and writing – there are a lot of ‘in progress’, but I hope that soon they will start moving towards complete. I just wish I had a time turner so I could have as much time as I wanted to get into everything!

Mini-Review Monday on a Tuesday: The Girls by Emma Cline

I did not read very many books last week, in fact I only read one – there were a number of deadlines to meet at work and I just didn’t have as much time as I would have liked to sit down and read. The one book I did read, however, which I started reading with some apprehension – I was not sure if I would love it or hate it, had me hooked. I am also half way through an audiobook and have just started an omnibus which totals over 1,000 words (I am still debating if it counts as one or three books). Hopefully, my reading this week will be far more successful.

For reference, the way I rate is as follows:

1-Unable to Finish ; 2-Did not enjoy ; 3-Liked ; 4-Really Liked ; 5-Loved

The Girls by Emma Cline

The Girls is a book I have had on my radar since it first came out but took a long time to pick it up. The main reason for this was that I’m normally very good at judging how much I will enjoy a book before reading but I really had no idea going into this – I was either going to really enjoy it or really dislike it. Fortunately for me, it was the former.

Evie Boyd is a fourteen-year-old girl who starts her summer spending time with her best friend and crushing on her best friend’s brother. Soon, however, a strange girl catches her eye and, before long, Evie finds herself involved in the midst of a cult. It’s a coming-of-age novel which explores emotion, sexuality and the desire to find a place in the world. It’s also a look back, partially told from an older Evie’s perspective as she reflects back on her youth.

I was really surprised by how much I enjoyed this book. It did take a little while to get used to how the story was being told (which partly due to me being a little over-tired when I started it), but once I was 50 or so pages in, I flew through it and ended up finishing it in a day. The writing was brilliant and really captured Evie’s character and the experiences she goes through while the pacing kept me reading. I did find the grown-up Evie chapters a little uninspiring to read and the ending did not quite work for me, but otherwise I really enjoyed this book and I’m glad I picked it up.

Rating: 4/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26210513-the-girls

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/The-Girls/9781784701741/?a_aid=rosienreads

Mini-Review Monday: Confident Data Skills, Crooked Kingdom, A Secret Sisterhood, On the Other Side, and The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue

It has been a couple of weeks since my last Mini-Review Monday, so there are quite a few books to cover. It has been a mixed few weeks. I have read some fantastic books but have also had a couple of bookish disappointments as well. As there are five books to discuss this week, I’m just going to dive straight into them.

For reference, the way I rate is as follows:

1-Unable to Finish ; 2-Did not enjoy ; 3-Liked ; 4-Really Liked ; 5-Loved

 

Confident Data Skills by Kirill Eremenko

Confident Data Skills was my final book of May and was a very different read for me. While I do occasionally read non-fiction, those are usually on topics like sexism or serial killers rather than data analytics. As a data analyst, however, this book did call to me.

This book offers to beginning to end insight into data science, from the gathering of questions and requirements at the start of a project to the presentation and dissemination of results at the end. While it could easily have gone into a lot of detail and complicated terminology, Confident Data Skills is incredibly accessible and discusses the topics in a manner which anyone interested in data science could understand but without it being patronising or too simplified. While it could have gone into more detail about the different kinds of algorithms used (it only covers a small number) and there were a few diagrams and images about colour that were in black and white, it provided a good introduction, and general resource, for data science.

Rating: 4/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34951858-confident-data-skills

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/Confident-Data-Skills-Kirill-Eremenko/9780749481544/?a_aid=rosienreads

 

Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo

If there was ever a duology I would push on anyone, it’s this one.

Crooked Kingdom is the first and last book in the Six of Crows duology, so I can’t say too much about plot. Only that it follows a group of miscreants who plan to pull off an impossible heist in order to gain a lot of money. I love everything about this series. The world-building is exceptional – it feels incredibly rich and alive, almost as if you could step into it. On top of that, the plot is intricate while also being gripping to read. However, the real strength of this duology, for me, is the group of characters. They are so well crafted and rounded that they could be people you know, and indeed they feel like you could easily join them in their escapades and be part of the team. This book builds on that even more, exploring the different relationships between each of them and building on their characters so much so that a character I didn’t particularly appreciate in the first book I thoroughly enjoyed in this one (although Inej and Kaz are still my favourites). I definitely recommend this duology if you haven’t picked it up already.

Rating: 4/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22299763-crooked-kingdom

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/Six-Crows-Crooked-Kingdom-Leigh-Bardugo/9781780622316/?a_aid=rosienreads

 

A Secret Sisterhood by Emily Midorikawa and Emma Claire Sweeney

The second non-fiction in this wrap up, which is a rarity in itself.

A Secret Sisterhood is a book about female friendships, specifically in the context of four famous female writers – Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot and Virginia Woolf. It explores each of the writers’ careers in the context of their friendship with another female writer (published or otherwise) of the time. While it was an interesting book to read, particularly with finding out about parts of the authors’ lives I had not previously been aware of, I found that the book struggled in making its case properly. Very little of the evidence to back up their descriptions of the friendships were included in the text, which made it very difficult to not see some of the points made as either guesswork or wishful thinking. This was particularly true of the older writers. If a few more diary entry segments or letter extracts had made their way into the pages of the book, it would have been a stronger text and have made more of an impact on me. That being said, I did enjoy the focus the book had on the female friendships, which is not something we often see in either non-fiction or fiction.

Rating: 3/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35464976-a-secret-sisterhood

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/A-Secret-Sisterhood/9781781315941/?a_aid=rosienreads

 

On the Other Side by Carrie Hope Fletcher

On the Other Side was probably the biggest reading disappointment in a long time. I went in expecting a lot more than I got out of it. The book itself is about a woman called Evie who, on dying, must remove the weights from her life that are preventing her from entering her own personal heaven, which sounded amazing. All of these weights revolve around a year she spent pursuing her passion to be an artist and falling in love with a violinist called Vincent.

Unfortunately, I really struggled to enjoy this book and considered DnFing it at one point. Most of this was due to the fact I could not bring myself to care about the Vincent story-line (and I spent the whole book feeling really sorry for Jim). I loved Evie as a character and would have really enjoyed seeing her fight for her passion to be an artist, but that is only side-lined to focus on her relationship with Vincent. The key conflicts on the book felt contrived and the introduction of the supernatural was a bit left-wing and awkward (although did make the book considerably more interesting for me).

The writing itself was easy to read and I actually ended up reading this book in a day. Carrie has put a lot of herself into this book and her voice as a writer is very strong (I could almost hear her reading the book to me as I read it), not to mention the diversity, however the story itself was not for me, no matter how much I want to support the author.

Rating: 2.5/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25744542-on-the-other-side

Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Other-Side-number-Sunday-bestseller/dp/0751563161/ref=sr_1_1

 

 

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee (narrated by Christian Coulson)

I had no idea what to expect with The Gentleman’s Guide to Vide and Virtue, but I dove straight in with the audiobook. The book itself is a historical fiction about a young man called Henry Montague who sets off on his tour of Europe with his sister Felicity and his best friend Percy in tow. Things are made slightly more complicated given the fact that Henry is head over heels in love in Percy, and then they all end up on a man-hunt across Europe after Henry steals from the King of France.

This book is essentially a lot of fun. It did take me a while to get into, due to getting use to the writing style as well as the fact Henry is quite dislikeable at the start of the book. As the book went on, however, I enjoyed it more and more. The situations they found themselves in were bizarre and entertaining. Not to mention that the fact that Henry acted completely opposite to a typical story protagonist and ended up getting themselves in even worse scraps just added to the fun of the book. It does have its serious moments and handed issues of race, sexuality and disability in the time period really well. The narrator (Christian Coulson) was also fantastic and really captured Henry, and the story, in his narration.

Rating: 4/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29283884-the-gentleman-s-guide-to-vice-and-virtue

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/Gentlemans-Guide-Vice-Virtue-Mackenzi-Lee/9780062382801/?a_aid=rosienreads

 

The Books I Read in May 2018

This year is moving far too quickly. It’s hard to believe that May is over already. As with the end of every month, below is a list of all the books I read in that month. May was a little different for me. Following the readathon I took part in for April, I found I was reading a lot of similar things which was sending me towards a reading slump. To avoid such a thing occurring, I went through May trying to make a conscious effort to pick up books which were very different to the last and ensuring that I read a broad range. As a result, I feel like I had a brilliant reading month. I enjoyed all the books I read, even those which I would not have normally picked up to read. I read a mix of short-story collections, more non-fiction than I thought I would read in a month and I finished off a series I have had on my shelf for years. I don’t think there is one particular stand-out novel, particularly as it’s so hard to compare them, but most of the books were fairly highly rated regardless.

For reference, the way I rate is as follows:

1-Unable to Finish ; 2-Did not enjoy ; 3-Liked ; 4-Really Liked ; 5-Loved

Audiobook

Jali: The Short Story Collection by Various – 3.5/5

Skald: The Short Story Collection by Various – 4/5

 

Paperback

The Falconer by Elizabeth May – 3.5/5

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People about Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge – 4/5

Something Rotten by Jasper Fforde – 4.5/5

Sleeping Beauties by Stephen King and Owen King – 4/5

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi – 4.5/5

Confident Data Skills by Kirill Eremenko – 4/5

 

Going into June, I am reading Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo and listening to The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee (narrated by Christian Coulson). As June is Pride month, I’m going to prioritise reading books with LGBTQA+ characters and themes and those two books seemed like a great way to kick the month off. I am looking forward to it.

Mini-Review Monday: Sleeping Beauties, When Breath Becomes Air, Skald and Jali

The bank holiday weekend is coming to a close and with it I finished the last of the four books I read in the last couple of weeks. I am continuing in my efforts to read a broader range of books in an attempt to avoid falling into another reading slump and, I have to say, I am enjoying it. I feel more excited about the next book I want to pick up because it is so different from the last and I am getting more of a feel for the huge range of stories and writers out there. These last two weeks I read a thriller and a memoir, as well as listened to two short story collections which encapsulated a variety of spaces on the spectrum of the genres they covered. I am very pleased with the books I read and am looking forward to another week of excellent reading.

For reference, the way I rate is as follows:

1-Unable to Finish ; 2-Did not enjoy ; 3-Liked ; 4-Really Liked ; 5-Loved

Sleeping Beauties by Stephen King and Owen King

Sleeping Beauties is a book I’ve had my eye on for a while and so I was really excited to read it once I got my hands on the paperback. The book is about a strange phenomenon, the Aurora, which takes over the world, causing all women to be wrapped in a cocoon, unable to wake, once they fall asleep. Written from the perspectives of members of the town of Dooling, it follows multiple characters as they deal with life (and struggle to stay awake if they’re female) as the Aurora claims more and more women. The appearance of the mysterious character of Evie also brings a twist on events.

I really enjoyed this book. This was particularly down to the characters, all of whom could have easily stepped from the pages of the book into real life (although, I wouldn’t want some of them to). The variety of people appearing on the pages and how individual they felt was incredibly done for a book with such a large cast of characters. The Aurora proved to be a fascinating story device, allowing an exploration of humanity and the extremity of some people’s reactions as half the world’s population fall into a deep slumber. While I did enjoy it, however, I did think that it was slightly too long. There were a series of background chapters which, while they did contribute to some of the characters’ histories, did end up breaking up the flow of the book. As such, I found the book dragging in places, particularly around the middle. However, the ending of the book was particularly gripping.

Rating: 4/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34466922-sleeping-beauties

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/Sleeping-Beauties-Owen-King/9781473681286/?a_aid=rosienreads

 

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

When Breath Becomes Air is not a book I would have chosen on my own, but instead it was recommended to me and so I picked it up when I had the chance. It is a book which follows the author as he goes from neurosurgeon reaching the end of his residency to cancer patient trying to find the meaning of life as he approaches the end of his. I read the book in a day and was in tears by the end – something which rarely happens to me in books.

The author is a clear writer, explaining his experiences in a way that is both easy to understand yet also captures the detail of being both neurosurgeon and cancer patient. It was quite difficult to read in places in terms of the experiences Kalanithi narrates but it was also interesting to see how one’s perspective can shift as different circumstances arise. It is a thought-provoking read and while the specific circumstances may not be relatable for everyone, the general themes of the book are.

Rating: 4.5/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25899336-when-breath-becomes-air

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/When-Breath-Becomes-Air-Paul-Kalanithi/9781784701994/?a_aid=rosienreads

 

Skald and Jali – Short Story Collections from Audible

Audible have recently released a series of audio shows which are free to Audible members. Amongst these are a series of short story collections: Skald, Jali and Bard, each of which covers a specific genre. Over the last couple of weeks, I have listened to both Skald, the collection of crime/thriller stories, and Jali, the collection of science-fiction stories. As someone who does not often read short stories and only picked these out because I was between credits on Audible, I was quite surprised with how much I enjoyed listening to them. While I did prefer the mixture of stories in the Skald collections more, both provided a broad view of the kinds of stories you can get in each genre. I also found the collections to be a good way to showcase both authors and the narrators. They are a great idea and I am glad that Audible is making these kinds of audio shows for its subscribers.

Skald Rating: 4/5

Jali Rating: 3.5/5

Audible: www.audible.co.uk

 

*I receive a small commission when purchases are made through the Book Depository links.

Mini-Review Monday: Catching Up

These last few weeks I have been a mix of rather busy and on holiday. As a result, I’ve fallen a little behind with these mini-reviews. To get back on track, I decided to write a very quick review for each book I read since my last reading update (of which, thankfully, there are only five). This includes the last book I read for the OWLs Readathon (Heir of Fire) and both the books I read while away on holiday (Something Rotten and Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race). I’m trying to be more varied with my reading lately as I found myself heading towards a reading slump caused, primarily, by the fact that I was reading some quite similar books, either in style, theme or genre. I have already started on this goal with the two books I read on holiday and so I shall endeavour to continue as it began.

For reference, the way I rate is as follows:

1-Unable to Finish ; 2-Did not enjoy ; 3-Liked ; 4-Really Liked ; 5-Loved

 

The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry

A woman escapes to Essex with her young son following the death of her husband; while there she encounters the legend of the mysterious Essex Serpent and the town’s conviction that it had returned. Written with a strong hand, The Essex Serpent conjures atmosphere with only a few words and really captures the essence of each character. The book is let down by Will Ransome as a character and Martha’s main story-line – I found very little in either that I could particularly enjoy and both seemed a little out of place amongst the mysticism that the Essex Serpent created. That being said, Stella and Francis really shone and were the reason I kept reading, alongside the incredible scene-weaving skills that Perry has.

Rating: 3.5/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32075861-the-essex-serpent

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/Essex-Serpent-Sarah-Perry/9781781255452/?a_aid=rosienreads

The Falconer by Elizabeth May

Lady Aileana is re-entering society following the death of her mother amidst rumours that she was the murderer herself; little do the upper class know that in her free time she builds weapons and hunts fae in the hopes of tracking down the faery who actually killed her mother. With a steampunk mix and a determined lead, The Falconer is different from its cousins – Aileana hunts of her own volition and she has very little intention of trying to balance her two lives. The book does, however, fall into some frustrating tropes (the only romance being one of them) and it ends on such an abrupt cliff-hanger that it feels like you’re expected to buy the next book (a pet peeve of mine – I like a good stand-alone feel to a series starter). I would happily read many books about Aileana, her best friend and the pixie which lives in her wardrobe, although I doubt that would ever happen; it’s also set in Scotland which was a delight to discover.

Rating: 3.5/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/16046550-the-falconer

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/Falconer-Elizabeth-May/9780575130425/?a_aid=rosienreads

Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge

A non-fiction book which holds no bars as Reni discusses race dynamics across a variety of angles (history, feminism, class) and why, as the title says, she decided to stop trying to have a conversation with White people about race. This book is honest, refreshing and tackles the issues in a clear and unafraid manner, spoken by someone whose voice should be heard above others (read: White people) in the discussion about race and racism. It is a short book and, as such, only goes into broad detail for each of the chapters, so providing a solid introduction to each of the issues and leaving it up to the reader to do further research. This book is eye-opening and really highlights how racism is still prevalent today, especially to those such as myself who don’t experience it in everyday life. While I feel like those who need to read a book like this are unlikely to give it a chance, I think this is a must-read for anyone interested in race relations and the impact that race still has.

Rating: 4/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36494117-why-i-m-no-longer-talking-to-white-people-about-race

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/Why-I-m-No-Longer-Talking-to-White-People-About-Race/9781408870587/?a_aid=rosienreads

Something Rotten by Jasper Fforde

The fourth and final book in the Thursday Next series – Thursday must continue her adventures as she rushes to save the world, all with a cheese-smuggling scandal under her belt, a minotaur on the loose, and a disgruntled Hamlet eating her mother’s best Battenberg. This book was just the book I needed to read when I read it – after a stretch of relatively similar books, the weird and wonderful world of Thursday Next was a welcome change of scene and I think the book was easily my favourite of the series. It does suffer from being a bit slow in places and I could have done without the Landon story-line which just felt like a distraction from Thursday’s story. Despite that, this was the book that helped me escape an approaching reading slump and really helped me get excited about reading new books, particularly those which fall outside of my default types of book.

Rating: 4.5/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/828395.Something_Rotten

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/Something-Rotten/9780340825952/?a_aid=rosienreads

 

Heir of Fire by Sarah J. Maas (narrated by Elizabeth Evans)

Heir of Fire is the third book in the Throne of Glass series; it introduces a myriad of new characters and expands the world in a wide range of directions. The expansion of this series was well handled – I loved seeing the tendrils reach out into new areas and bring in new people to get to know (Manon in particular), not to mention getting to see the original characters in new situations without each other to rely on. I still do not like Chaol, still struggle to see how Celaena became such a feared assassin and still find it irritating that only pale women with fair hair (or dark hair if the skin is very pale) are described as beautiful in this series. For all its faults, I did find this to be my favourite of the Throne of Glass series so far. I’ve heard mixed things about the rest of the series so am hesitant to continue on, but from what I’ve seen I am happy with the direction the books appear to be heading in so may pick up the next on one day.

Rating: 4/5

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22914781-heir-of-fire

The Book Depository*: https://www.bookdepository.com/Heir-Fire-Sarah-J-Maas/9781408839126/?a_aid=rosienreads

 

*I receive a small commission when purchases are made through the Book Depository links.